The Role of the Event Producer

Dec 26th

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Welcome back everyone! How was your Christmas? We hope you had a wonderful day, surrounded by those closest to you. Did anyone create a killer Christmas tablescape or an event? Drop me a line at [email protected] and show off your work. I might even feature it on our blog!

Why am I still at my desk on Boxing Day? The same reason you’re here, reading of course!  Not everyone stops for weeks on end over Christmas, and we’re no exception. With our recent 12 Deals of Christmas promotion, we’re busy little bees, enrolling our 2014 cohort, and as we’ve been chatting to prospective students recently, we’ve been discussing dreams, desires and ambitions for the coming year in order to match everyone to the right course. Often we get questions like “What’s the difference between an event co-ordinator and a wedding planner?” or “What does an events designer do?” – however as the world turns and paradigms shift, there is a new buzzword that is making its way into the events world, so I thought I’d address this one for you this week, particularly if you are wanting to take that step, but aren’t entirely sure what each of the main roles are in this constantly-changing industry.

Today, I’m talking about the role of the “Event Producer.”

Once upon a time, wedding planners were for a very select few clientele. If your wedding required certain theming or catering, or had over 100 invited guests, then you were obviously had the money to be able to throw such a party, and would therefore require the services of an event professional – many of which were in-house positions, secondary to other major roles within a company.

I’m not exaggerating when I say that this industry has grown exponentially in the last 10 years.  Lately, we’ve seen Wedding Planners take on more than their predecessors ever used to. The wedding planners of the 80s and 90s had scripts to follow. Back then, the only choices were which bright color should the bridesmaids wear (a theme that would be then carried through to the rest of the event), what flowers should the bride carry, and which type of limousine would ferry the party between the church and the reception venue.  It was a simpler time that called for simpler organisation, and the only items required in the planner’s handbag were safety pins and tissues.

Let's face it - most 80's weddings looked a little like this. Source: Inspiritoo

Let’s face it – most 80’s weddings looked a little like carbon-copy, out-of-the-box events much like this. Source: Inspiritoo

 

Weddings of course, aren’t the simple affairs that they used to be. Nowadays, planning a wedding is an art. It is a diverse, bespoke piece of event-artistry and no two are alike. Every bride wants to be special. Every bride wants to be unique, wear a knock-out designer gown, keep up with emerging  (not just current) trends and have the entire event featured on a high-end wedding blog. Back in the 1980’s – brides just wanted to feel special on their big day. Now – they want to create experiences for their guests, and if they can, grab their 5 minutes of fame – along with the vendors who work tirelessly to make it happen (also hoping that some of the associated spotlight will rub off on them).

We’ve seen the rise of the Wedding (or Event) Planner, followed by the Wedding (or Event) Designer,  and now we’re seeing LinkedIn profiles change to reflect the new buzzword of the industry….the “Event Producer”.

 

So what is an Event Producer?

The Event Producer is similar to a Project Manager. They are responsible for the oversight and coordination for an event from its initial concept to the management of maintenance workers once the event has ended. They are responsible not only for the paperwork, but the very concept and design of the event space. They’re not just a hybrid of planner and designer, inasmuch as they don’t just pick palettes and create schedules – they produce experiences.

While an Event Planner will handle the budgeting, scheduling, booking, and coordination of venues and vendors and some will dabble in the design and implementation of a theme – their role is about 90% administrative.

That being said….a truly great Event Producer will think outside the square. They will be one step ahead of current trends, have their own definitive style, and have the ability to create pure alchemy. No two of their events will be alike and each one will be handcrafted to meet the needs of their clients. They weave magic, paint masterpieces and create new worlds.

Source: Vitaime

Source: Vitaime

 

How to Become an Event Producer

There’s no such thing as a born events professional. Do your research and you’ll note that even the highest-paid, acclaimed celebrity Event Producer started small. They did the groundwork – often coming from a hospitality or administration position that afforded them the opportunity to plan small events. Many times they start by planning weddings for friends, baby showers and the like. Somewhere along the line however, they decide that they want to step up and learn more about the industry, so many will gain a qualification in order to not only get that experience, but become accredited and if you ask any of them, they’ll tell you that education is king. They’ll learn not only how to create an event, but how to run a business, how to market themselves and most importantly – they’ll learn about every facet of event production under the sun. It’s not uncommon for an event producer to be well versed in not just design lingo but know a decent amount about catering, audio production, lighting, electrical, carpentry as well as health and safety. Many have a solid understanding of architecture and textiles also.

After that, they gain years of experience producing mid-range events – learning from their mistakes, and taking on bigger and better challenges. Only then when they have established a name for themselves, do they often take that next step, go out on a limb and secure their first high-end client. This client is pivotal to the success of their business, so it crucial that their one of a kind event goes off without a hitch. No room for error, or miscalculation.

 

Event Producers are highly paid, and sought after event professionals for a reason. They have done the work, they have put in the time. They’ve apprenticed in the industry and they’ve kept pushing, kept fighting for their passion, and above all – they’ve kept learning.

Do you have a hunger for event production that goes above and beyond co-ordination and administration? Do you see yourself creating breathtaking experiences and unforgettable events? We can help you not only become qualified, but accredited. Get educated – get the edge. Send us an email and we’ll find the course that suits your ambitions so you can get on your way.

 

 
 

Dec 26th

Share and
inspire others

Welcome back everyone! How was your Christmas? We hope you had a wonderful day, surrounded by those closest to you. Did anyone create a killer Christmas tablescape or an event? Drop me a line at [email protected] and show off your work. I might even feature it on our blog!

Why am I still at my desk on Boxing Day? The same reason you’re here, reading of course!  Not everyone stops for weeks on end over Christmas, and we’re no exception. With our recent 12 Deals of Christmas promotion, we’re busy little bees, enrolling our 2014 cohort, and as we’ve been chatting to prospective students recently, we’ve been discussing dreams, desires and ambitions for the coming year in order to match everyone to the right course. Often we get questions like “What’s the difference between an event co-ordinator and a wedding planner?” or “What does an events designer do?” – however as the world turns and paradigms shift, there is a new buzzword that is making its way into the events world, so I thought I’d address this one for you this week, particularly if you are wanting to take that step, but aren’t entirely sure what each of the main roles are in this constantly-changing industry.

Today, I’m talking about the role of the “Event Producer.”

Once upon a time, wedding planners were for a very select few clientele. If your wedding required certain theming or catering, or had over 100 invited guests, then you were obviously had the money to be able to throw such a party, and would therefore require the services of an event professional – many of which were in-house positions, secondary to other major roles within a company.

I’m not exaggerating when I say that this industry has grown exponentially in the last 10 years.  Lately, we’ve seen Wedding Planners take on more than their predecessors ever used to. The wedding planners of the 80s and 90s had scripts to follow. Back then, the only choices were which bright color should the bridesmaids wear (a theme that would be then carried through to the rest of the event), what flowers should the bride carry, and which type of limousine would ferry the party between the church and the reception venue.  It was a simpler time that called for simpler organisation, and the only items required in the planner’s handbag were safety pins and tissues.

Let's face it - most 80's weddings looked a little like this. Source: Inspiritoo

Let’s face it – most 80’s weddings looked a little like carbon-copy, out-of-the-box events much like this. Source: Inspiritoo

 

Weddings of course, aren’t the simple affairs that they used to be. Nowadays, planning a wedding is an art. It is a diverse, bespoke piece of event-artistry and no two are alike. Every bride wants to be special. Every bride wants to be unique, wear a knock-out designer gown, keep up with emerging  (not just current) trends and have the entire event featured on a high-end wedding blog. Back in the 1980’s – brides just wanted to feel special on their big day. Now – they want to create experiences for their guests, and if they can, grab their 5 minutes of fame – along with the vendors who work tirelessly to make it happen (also hoping that some of the associated spotlight will rub off on them).

We’ve seen the rise of the Wedding (or Event) Planner, followed by the Wedding (or Event) Designer,  and now we’re seeing LinkedIn profiles change to reflect the new buzzword of the industry….the “Event Producer”.

 

So what is an Event Producer?

The Event Producer is similar to a Project Manager. They are responsible for the oversight and coordination for an event from its initial concept to the management of maintenance workers once the event has ended. They are responsible not only for the paperwork, but the very concept and design of the event space. They’re not just a hybrid of planner and designer, inasmuch as they don’t just pick palettes and create schedules – they produce experiences.

While an Event Planner will handle the budgeting, scheduling, booking, and coordination of venues and vendors and some will dabble in the design and implementation of a theme – their role is about 90% administrative.

That being said….a truly great Event Producer will think outside the square. They will be one step ahead of current trends, have their own definitive style, and have the ability to create pure alchemy. No two of their events will be alike and each one will be handcrafted to meet the needs of their clients. They weave magic, paint masterpieces and create new worlds.

Source: Vitaime

Source: Vitaime

 

How to Become an Event Producer

There’s no such thing as a born events professional. Do your research and you’ll note that even the highest-paid, acclaimed celebrity Event Producer started small. They did the groundwork – often coming from a hospitality or administration position that afforded them the opportunity to plan small events. Many times they start by planning weddings for friends, baby showers and the like. Somewhere along the line however, they decide that they want to step up and learn more about the industry, so many will gain a qualification in order to not only get that experience, but become accredited and if you ask any of them, they’ll tell you that education is king. They’ll learn not only how to create an event, but how to run a business, how to market themselves and most importantly – they’ll learn about every facet of event production under the sun. It’s not uncommon for an event producer to be well versed in not just design lingo but know a decent amount about catering, audio production, lighting, electrical, carpentry as well as health and safety. Many have a solid understanding of architecture and textiles also.

After that, they gain years of experience producing mid-range events – learning from their mistakes, and taking on bigger and better challenges. Only then when they have established a name for themselves, do they often take that next step, go out on a limb and secure their first high-end client. This client is pivotal to the success of their business, so it crucial that their one of a kind event goes off without a hitch. No room for error, or miscalculation.

 

Event Producers are highly paid, and sought after event professionals for a reason. They have done the work, they have put in the time. They’ve apprenticed in the industry and they’ve kept pushing, kept fighting for their passion, and above all – they’ve kept learning.

Do you have a hunger for event production that goes above and beyond co-ordination and administration? Do you see yourself creating breathtaking experiences and unforgettable events? We can help you not only become qualified, but accredited. Get educated – get the edge. Send us an email and we’ll find the course that suits your ambitions so you can get on your way.